United States Office of Government Ethics, Preventing Conflicts of Interest in the Executive Branch

Executive Orders

Several executive orders are of current or historical significance to the executive branch ethics program. These are listed below.


01/21/2009

Executive Order 13490 (Jan. 21, 2009): Prescribing Standards of Ethical Conduct for Government Officers and Employeespdf
Executive Order 13490 requires political appointees to agree to additional restrictions by signing an Ethics Pledge.

12/27/2005

Executive Order 13392 (Dec. 27, 2005): Improving Agency Disclosure of Informationpdf
Executive Order 13392 directed each agency to review its FOIA operations, develop a plan to ensure that the agency's administration of the FOIA is in accordance with applicable law and the Executive Order, and periodically report on its progress.

01/03/2001

Executive Order 13184 (Jan 3, 2001): Revocation of Executive Order 12834pdf
Executive Order 13184 revoked Executive Order 12834.

01/20/1993

Executive Order 12834 (Jan. 20, 1993): Ethics Commitments by Executive Branch Appointeespdf
Executive Order 12834 has been revoked. It required senior political appointees to agree to additional restrictions by signing an Ethics Pledge.

10/17/1990

Executive Order 12731 (Oct. 17, 1990): Principles of Ethical Conduct for Government Officers and Employeespdf
Executive Order 12731 modified Executive Order 12674.   

04/12/1989

Executive Order 12674 (Apr. 12, 1989): Principles of Ethical Conduct for Government Officers and Employeespdf
Executive Order 12674 sets out the basic principles of ethical conduct that are the foundation of the Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch, at 5 C.F.R. part 2635.

05/08/1965

Executive Order 11222 (May 8, 1965): Prescribing Standards of Ethical Conduct for Government Officers and Employeespdf
Executive Order 11222 has been revoked.  It set out the basic principles of ethical conduct that were the foundation of the agency standards of conduct regulations that were replaced by the current executive branch-wide Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch, at 5 C.F.R. part 2635.